May-12-2014

Announcing Mental Health Month Blog Day 2014 #mhblogday

Announcing Mental Health Month Blog Day 2014 #mhblogday

 

 

The fifth annual Mental Health Month Blog Day begins Wednesday morning, and we can’t wait to read and share the many, many posts that bloggers everywhere will create, talking about why mental health matters and stigma hurts.

We’ll begin publishing a round-up of submitted links at about 10a.m. EDT.

Our round-up blog post linking to participating blogs and their mental health blog day-dedicated posts will be updated about every two hours throughout the day until about 5 p.m. EDT. Wednesday. We’ll then take a break from blogging (because sleep is important to good mental health) and add the posts submitted overnight on Thursday morning. We’ll do our best to capture all the posts and submissions throughout the day, but let us know if you think we may have overlooked your post.

Participating is easy.

Publish a blog post that incorporates mental health’s importance. Tell people why it’s important to you and why it should be important to …[Read More]

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May-08-2014

Give the personal touch for Mother’s Day

Give the personal touch for Mother’s Day

With Mother’s Day almost upon us, we are reminded that is a holiday for reconnecting with our mothers and, in effect, allowing us to also reunite with our entire family. It is a day we stop and thank our mother for all she has shared with us throughout our life, the gifts–both physical and emotional–she has given us, and for “just” being our mother.

But HOW do YOU reconnect with your mom on Mother’s Day?

Do you send her an email or a text? How about a shout-out via Twitter or post your thanks and endearing love on Facebook?

Around 1980, AT&T had the marketing slogan “Reach out and touch someone.”  Although using your AT&T smartphone today to wish your mother a happy Mother’s Day fits well with their marketing plan, it is not what they intended for you to do then. Rolling back the clock to 1979, we find that Americans had begun to travel more and more away from their homes, moving to …[Read More]

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May-05-2014

The problem of chronic pain: Don’t stop believin’

The problem of chronic pain: Don’t stop believin’

 

Because chronic pain is an “invisible” disability, one of the biggest challenges faced by patients with chronic pain is having their pain taken seriously and believed, both by health professionals and the general public. When medical tests reveal no identifiable organic cause for their pain, patients are told that they exaggerating or that the pain is “all in their head.”

Computers reading faces better than people?

A recent paper found that a computer program was better able to detect faked facial expressions of pain in patients than human adult observers (who generally fare no better than chance). The results of this paper have generated considerable media attention, including headline stories in major news outlets proclaiming “Computers Can Tell If You’re Really in Pain—Even Better Than People Can.” The New York Times even created an interactive web post about this work in which their readers can view patient videos and try to guess for themselves whether the patient is faking pain or not (“Are …[Read More]

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Apr-30-2014

Helping your teen cope with end-of-school-year tests

Helping your teen cope with end-of-school-year tests

 

 

As the school year draws to a close, and as students prepare for final  exams, standardized tests, and college admissions exams, their ability to deal with all of these pressures may be pushed to the maximum.

Recent findings from a survey on stress may come as a surprise to many of you: Teens report stress levels that are comparable to adults.  Adults ask how it is possible that teens – without the grown-up pressures of work, money and family responsibilities — can feel so stressed. What is it that they really have to worry about?

According to the Stress in America survey by American Psychological Association, there are a few things that are causing most teens significant stress.  School is the most frequently cited cause of stress for youth  ages 13-17, followed by the pressure of getting into a good college or deciding what to do after high school.  And the stress is affecting their emotional and physical health. It causes them to neglect responsibilities, feel overwhelmed, have …[Read More]

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